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Aspect Skincare Australia
https://aspectskincare.com/blogs/the-lab/spf-facts-myths-your-need-to-know

SPF Facts & Myths you Need to Know

We know that investing in our health and wellbeing today will reward us tomorrow. This means living a healthy, active lifestyle and looking after our skin with quality skincare. Unfortunately, due to our fast-paced lifestyles and given that we are often time poor, the needs of our skin can sometimes be overlooked. Simply applying a moisturiser before running out the door won’t protect skin from UV and damaging environmental conditions that can affect both its health and beauty. Research shows that over 80% of premature skin ageing is caused by exposure to environmental aggressors including UV rays.1 Here a few Sunscreen Facts and Myths you need to know.

YES, YOU SHOULD STILL WEAR SUNSCREEN, IF YOU WORK IN AN OFFICE.

It is common to assume that being indoors means we’re safe from sun exposure. However, although not in direct sunlight, it doesn’t mean that UVA and UVB rays aren’t damaging our skin. While glass can effectively protect the skin from UVB rays, UVA rays have a longer wavelength, meaning they can penetrate glass and still contribute to premature skin ageing including the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles and pigmentation.

SPF50+ DOES NOT MEAN YOU CAN STAY IN THE SUN FOR LONGER THAN IF WEARING SPF30.

An SPF30 absorbs 96.7%of all the UV rays and SPF50+ absorbs 98%. While an SPF50+ does filter a higher percentage of UV rays, sunscreen testing does not account for common usage occasions. When we are at the beach or by the pool, swimming, perspiring and towel drying can all effect the integrity of sunscreen. Both SPF30 and SPF50+ should always be used in conjunction with other sun protection measures and reapplied every 2 hours to ensure adequate protection.

Sun protection measures include:

Slip on sun protectant clothing to cover as much skin as possible.
Slop on some sunscreen at least 20 minutes prior to sun exposure using a minimum SPF30 broad spectrum product; sunscreen should not be used as a standalone sun protectant strategy and should not allow for an extended period of time in the sun.
Slap on a hat; broad rimmed or legionnaires hat is best.
Seek shade and avoid all sun exposure where possible.
Slide on sunglasses that meet Australian Standards for UV protection.

 

Aspect Sun CC Cream image

 

NOT ALL SUNSCREENS ARE OILY

While traditional sunscreens have been known to leave an oily finish on the skin, new developments in sunscreen formulations means there are now dry touch options available. The Aspect Sun collection has been formulated with tapioca starch and silica to impart a dry touch finish that is suitable for all skin types and sits beautifully under make up.

NOT ALL SUNSCREENS ARE THE SAME

There are two different types of sunscreen, physical sunscreens and chemical sunscreens.

Physical sunscreens reflect the UV ray while chemical sunscreens absorb UV rays. Although they protect our skin differently, all sunscreens go through the same testing to ensure effective protection.

DON’T BE FOOLED BY HIGHER SPF SUNSCREENS AVAILABLE OVERSEAS

Although there sunscreens overseas may claim a higher SPF protection, it does not necessarily mean superior protection. In Australia sunscreens are regulated by the TGA (Therapeutic Goods Administration), the same regulatory body that govern the sales of medicines and medical devices. Due to the high UV exposure in Australia and a high incidence of skin cancer, the TGA enforce some of the strictest sunscreen laws around the world to ensure the safety of all Australian consumers. This means that those higher rated SPF sunscreens overseas may not meet our high sunscreen standard.

THERE IS NO CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE TO PROVE THAT CHEMICAL SUNSCREENS ARE CAUSING HARM

Although there have been numerous studies conducted on the effects of chemical sunscreens on the body, there has been no conclusive evidence to show that they are causing any harm. Professor Sanchia Aranda, CEO, Cancer Council Australia stated, “Even if the sunscreen chemicals were absorbed, there is limited evidence to suggest that this would cause harm, but we do know that excess UV causes skin cancer and that sunscreen helps prevent skin cancer.”2 It is also important to remember that sunscreen should only be used as a last line of defence against harmful UV rays.

SPF IN MAKE UP DOES NOT NECESSARILY PROVIDE ADEQUATE SUN PROTECTION

The SPF in make-up is not less effective than sunscreen, however, the regulations around SPF in makeup are different. To ensure maximum sun protection, it is recommended to use a minimum SPF30 primary sunscreen before application of moisturiser and make up.

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